Mushroom stroganoff

Mushroom stroganoff served with rice and fresh coriander
Stroganoff is a traditional Russian stew consisting of chunks of beef cooked in a stock and sour cream sauce flavoured with mustard or tomato paste or both. Nowadays it’s usually flavoured with a generous sprinkling of sweet and smoky paprika – though I’m not sure how traditional this is, it certainly adds a beautiful depth of flavour to the sauce. The warm, creamy sauce makes this a lovely dinner for a chilly autumn evening, piled on a hefty serving of carbs (rice, pasta, mashed potato, thickly cut sourdough toast….wait, where was I?).

Autumn is also the time of year that many varieties of wild mushrooms are in season. I absolutely love mushrooms, and I don’t believe that you’re missing out on anything by substituting the usual strips of beef with mushrooms in this recipe, especially if you can find a mix of different types that are both meaty and packed with flavour. I used a combination of Portobello, chestnut and chanterelle mushrooms, the latter of which were a very exciting find in the local organic grocers. Chanterelles can be found in the UK from late summer all throughout autumn, and I think they are just as exciting (and expensive…) as a piece of good quality steak. You can use whatever variety of mushrooms you prefer or which are available in the shops. Of course if you dislike mushrooms then you can switch back to the traditional beef – use a cut suitable for quick cooking such as rump or sirloin.

One year ago:
Steak pie with puff pastry
Toad in the hole with onion gravy
Easy apple tarts
Ingredients for wild mushroom stroganoff
Ingredients (serves 2)
400g mixed mushrooms
1 tbsp olive oil
25g butter
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed or finely chopped
1 tsp paprika
¼ tsp hot chilli powder
½ tsp Dijon mustard
½ tbsp tomato puree
Splash of white wine
100ml vegetable stock
3 tbsp sour cream
Salt and pepper
Fresh parsley to garnish
Rice to serve

Method
1. Prepare the mushrooms. Lightly rinse them if you feel like they’re very grubby, but a wipe with a damp cloth and a quick dust of the gills with a pastry brush should do the job. Slice or halve any large mushrooms so that they are all in similar bite-sized pieces.
Mixed cleaned and sliced mushrooms
2. Heat the olive oil and butter in a large pan until the butter begins to bubble.
Heating butter and olive oil in a large pan
3. Tip in the onion and garlic and mix well in the olive and butter. Cook over a medium heat for about five minutes until the onion has softened.
Frying onion and garlic in olive oil and butter
4. Turn up the heat and add the mushrooms, mixing well again. Fry quickly until the mushrooms begin to brown, adding a little extra butter if necessary.
Adding mixed mushrooms to the onions and garlic
5. Stir through the paprika, chilli powder, mustard and tomato puree, then add the white wine and allow to bubble for a few minutes.
Adding white wine to the mixed mushrooms
6. Add the vegetable stock and sour cream and stir well. Reduce the heat and cook for another few minutes until the sauce is well combined and the mushrooms are cooked through. Season to taste with salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper.
Adding sour cream to the mushroom stroganoff
Finishing the mushroom stroganoff with seasoning
Serve the stroganoff with rice, or pasta such as tagliatelle if you prefer, and top with fresh parsley.
Mushroom stroganoff served with rice
Mushroom stroganoff served with fresh coriander

Pickled beetroot

Beetroots pickled in white wine vinegar, brown sugar and spices
I absolutely love sharp flavours. I love the sour tang of a fizzy sweet or a slice of lemon tart, my salad dressings are always strong with lemon juice or vinegar or both, and don’t even try giving me a fish supper without a pickled onion on the side. Pickles are the ideal antidote to a craving for something sharp and sour, and they come in any variety you could want: onions, cucumbers, carrots, cabbage, walnuts, beetroots, the mysterious pickled egg (which I am yet to try…it seems a pickle too far to me but do correct me if I’m wrong). Pickling is also a fantastic way to preserve fresh vegetables either if you have a huge glut or if you’re a small household, like us.

I got a bag of home-grown fresh beetroot from my dad a couple of weeks ago, but with only two of us in the house, one of us feeling very under the weather and the weeks menu already planned and bought I wasn’t sure where to incorporate these beautiful little vegetables into our meals. Pickling it was. A jar of pickled vegetables will keep extremely well in the fridge for several months, if not longer. Just make sure that you sterilise the jar before filling – wash the jar in hot soapy water, fill to the brim with boiling water and then drain and leave upside down in a warm oven or on the counter top to air dry completely.

One year ago:
Pasta carbonara
Ingredients for pickled beetroot
Ingredients (makes one large jar)
500g beetroot
300ml white wine vinegar
200ml water
200g light brown sugar
2 bay leaves
3 whole cloves
1 tsp peppercorns
1 tsp mustard seeds
1 tsp course sea salt

Method
1. Give the beetroots a scrub under cold water if they still have earth on them, and trim the leaves and roots. Place in a large pan of water and bring to the boil. Simmer for 10-15 minutes, depending on the size of the beetroots, until a sharp knife can be easily inserted.
Washed and trimmed beetroots ready to be boiled
Boiled beetroots
2. Drain the beetroots and leave to cool.
Boiled and drained beetroots ready to be peeled and sliced
3. Peel the beetroots (this should be quite easy – I used kitchen roll to gently rub away the skin which meant my hands didn’t end up dyed completely red!) and cut into thick slices. Pack the beetroot slices into a large sterilised jar.
Thickly sliced beetroots
Thickly sliced beetroots
4. Place the vinegar, water, sugar and spices into a small pan. Bring the mixture to the boil and simmer for 2 minutes, stirring until the sugar has dissolved.
Pickling liquor made of vinegar, sugar and aromatics
5. Put a teaspoon of sea salt on top of the sliced beetroot.
Adding a teaspoon of course sea salt to the sliced beetroot
6. Carefully pour the hot pickling liquor over the beetroot to fill the jar. You might not need all the liquid, but make sure to pack all the spices in. Leave to cool then seal with the lid and store in the fridge.
Pouring the hot pickling liquor over the sliced beetroot
Pouring the hot pickling liquor over the sliced beetroot
The beetroot doesn’t need a long maturing time, you can eat it a couple of days after pickling. It will keep well in the fridge for several months – label the jar so you remember when they were made.
Pickled beetroot
Serve the pickles with a spread of cheese and crackers, or use in sandwiches or a goat cheese salad…or just creep to the fridge and eat a slice straight out the jar if your cravings demand it.

Habas con jamón (broad bean and Serrano ham stew)

Habas con jamon serrano served with a poached duck egg with a runny yolk
When I was about 3 years old my family spent 3 months in Granada in the south of Spain. My dad was on a sabbatical with work and my mum was still on maternity leave after my little brother and sister had been born. Some of my earliest memories are from our time in Spain – vague, fuzzy recollections of eating jamón sliced off the bone on the balcony of our apartment, rows of kids lined up on the floor for our afternoon siestas at my nursery school and the very specific way that my nursery teacher used to peel fresh oranges (still known to this day as “The Mercedes Way” in our household). To help with all the children at home we had a live-in au-pair, a Spanish woman called Coco, and this is one of her recipes. It’s a rich, hearty stew and despite its peasant origins the dish has bags and bags (and bags) of flavour.

To get the depth of flavour in this dish you really need to get the right bit of Serrano ham – not the light meat which is sliced into thin slivers for eating, but the tough, dark meat right next to the bone usually used for stocks. Of course, if you’re living in Spain then getting your hands on this is easy, but it’s a slightly trickier task in the UK. Try Spanish or Mexican (or other) delis or even the deli counter at your local supermarket – they might do you a nice deal on this part of the ham. In my area of Edinburgh I was struggling to find the meat when I struck the jackpot at the tapas restaurant Tápame. The lovely chef there very kindly gave me a whole Serrano ham bone, which not only had plenty of dark meat on it but also added the most delicious, decadent flavour to the stew. You don’t need to add a bone to the stew – it isn’t included in Coco’s original recipe – but lucky you if you can find one! Be careful about adding salt if you use a bone – you probably won’t need to add any extra salt at all. If you can’t find any dark meat at all, then you can still use slices of the lighter ham, but the flavour won’t be quite the same.

Broad beans are in season right now, and won’t last much longer than the month, so get out to your local green grocers and get cooking!

One year ago:
Mini puff pastry apple pies
Ingredients for habas con jamon serrano
Ingredients (serves two as a main course, or more as part of a spread of tapas)
150-200g dark serrano ham (or a 500g bone, with meat)
1.5-2kg fresh broad beans still in their pods (about 500-600g once podded)
6-8 large Spanish spring onions or 1 white onion
2 garlic cloves
Extra virgin olive oil
Small glass of white wine
Freshly ground black pepper and salt
Optional to serve: fresh bread and poached eggs

Method
1. If you have managed to get your mitts on a gorgeous serrano ham bone then remove as much of the tough, dark meat as possible. You will need a small, very sharp knife to do this – I actually used my Swiss Army pen knife. If you have bought a chunk of meat then simply chop into small pieces.
Serrano ham bone with all the meat removed
Jamon serrano
2. Pod the broad beans (one of the most therapeutic kitchen tasks) and set aside for later.
Podded fresh organic broad beans
3. Chop the onions and finely chop the garlic cloves.
Finely chopped Spanish spring onions
4. Heat about 4 tbsp of good quality olive oil in a pan (large enough to hold the ham bone if you are using one). Add the onions and garlic and gently fry on a low heat for 5-10 minutes until soft.
Gently frying spring onions in extra virgin olive oil
Softened spring onions in extra virgin olive oil
5. Stir in the serrano ham, and continue to cook gently for about 5 minutes.
Adding serrano ham to the softened spring onions
6. Add the broad beans to the pot and stir to coat well in the oil. Increase the heat and pour in the wine, allowing it to bubble for a couple of minutes.
Adding broadbeans to the ham and onion
7. Reduce the heat to the very lowest setting possible and nestle the ham bone amongst the beans. Cover the pan with a lid and cook very slowly for 2 hours. Keep an eye on the stew while it cooks and if it looks particularly dry add a splash of water.
Adding the serrano ham bone to the stew
Habas con jamon after two hours of slow cooking
8. Taste and season with black pepper (and salt, if necessary). Serve immediately, or leave to cool and reheat later. This can be kept in the fridge, or even the freezer, if you want to make it in advance.
Reheating the habas con jamon
9. To serve, gently poach 2 eggs (I managed to find some incredible duck eggs at our local organic shop) and slice some crusty bread to soak up all the delicious liquid at the bottom of the stew.
Habas con jamon served with sourdough bread
Fresh duck eggs for poaching
Habas con jamon served with a poached duck egg and sourdough bread
Habas con jamon serrano served with a poached duck egg with a runny yolk

Dauphinoise potatoes


Does a recipe need much more introduction than that video…? Probably not, but I’ll give you one anyway. Back in June I mentioned that I was going to France for a couple of weeks, and that I would be attempting to eat and drink all the cheese and wine that the country had to offer. Well, we put in a good effort and ate like kings (or queens) for two weeks. We had delicious homemade meals expertly cooked by my Grandpa, dined on fresh local seafood on the island of Houat, tried regional specialties like gallettes and cidre royal in Normandy and had the most simple lunch picnics by the side of the road that were turned gourmet due to the amazing quality of the ingredients – fresh baguette, perfectly ripe tomatoes and soft, melty cheese (thanks to the heat!).

By far the best meal we had out was in a small town in Normandy called Sainte-Mère-Église. Although it’s small, Sainte-Mère-Église is well-known and gets a lot of day visitors. This is partly because it was the first village to be liberated on D-Day, but also thanks to the incident involving the American paratrooper John Steele. In the very early hours of the morning on D-Day about 13,000 paratroopers of the Airborne Division of the US Army dropped into Normandy. The parachute of one particular paratrooper, 31-year-old John Steele, became tangled in one of the church spires, leaving him dangling on the side of the church. Despite playing dead, he was cut down and take prisoner by German soldiers, but he managed to escape a few days later and re-join his division to continue fighting through France. John survived the war and regularly went back to visit Sainte-Mère-Église during his life. He was made an honorary citizen of the town and had a statue erected in his honour – a model of a man, parachute attached, hanging from the church steeple. On our last night in Sainte-Mère-Église we ate at the Auberge John Steele, which is named after the soldier and was recommended to us by my parents. And so this is all a very long way round of saying that I had the best dauphinoise potatoes of my life at this restaurant! They were just the side to my main dish of steak and mushrooms, but I decided right then that I had to recreate them when I got home. So here we are: my version of the most indulgent, rich, creamy side dish you could ever ask for…

One year ago:
Hot redcurrant and raspberry mousse
Ingredients for dauphinoise potatoes
Ingredients (serves 2-4, depending on your appetite!)
Butter for greasing
400g (about 2 large) floury potatoes e.g. Maris Piper, Red Rooster or King Edward
150ml double cream
100ml milk
1 garlic clove
Fresh nutmeg
Salt and pepper
15g parmesan, grated

Method
1. Heat the oven to 190C/170C fan/Gas Mark 5. Grease an ovenproof dish well with a little butter.
Greasing the ovenproof dish with butter
2. Peel and thinly slice the potatoes to roughly the width of a £1 coin, or thinner if your knife skills allows. You could also use a mandolin or a food processor with a slicer attachment. Don’t wash the slices potatoes as you want them to retain all their starch to help thicken the cream sauce.
Peeled and thinly sliced Maris Piper potatoes
3. Pour the cream and milk into a large saucepan and add the whole garlic clove, lightly crushed with the back of a knife. Season with salt, pepper and a little freshly grated nutmeg. Place over a medium heat and bring to a simmer.
Double cream, milk, garlic, nutmeg and seasoning
4. Add the potatoes to the cream and stir well to coat. Simmer for 5-10 minutes, depending on the thickness of your slices, until the potatoes are just cooked. Give the pan a gentle shake as the potatoes cook so that they don’t stick together or catch on the bottom of the pan. The sauce will begin to thicken from the starch in the potatoes.
Adding the sliced potatoes to the cream sauce
5. Remove the potatoes with a slotted or wide spoon and carefully place in layers in your dish. Pour over any remaining cream sauce (remembering to discard the garlic clove!).
Ready to layer the dauphinoise potatoes
Layered potato slices and cream sauce
6. Sprinkle over the cheese and bake for 30 minutes until the potatoes are cooked through and browned on top – increase the heat for another 5 minutes until the top is crispy enough to your liking.
Sprinkling parmesan cheese on the dauphinoise potatoes
Homemade dauphinoise potatoes 2
Leave the dish to stand for at least 5-10 minutes after baking, while you get the rest of your meal prepared. Don’t worry – the dish will stay piping hot, but this allows the hot, bubbling potatoes to settle and makes it easier to slice and spoon out portions.
Homemade dauphinoise potatoes 4
Serve with any meat of your choice, though I’d recommend steering clear of any cream sauces, since this is such a rich, indulgent side dish! We had ours with this BBC Good Food recipe for chicken with mushrooms and peas, and a glass of crisp white wine. Perfect Sunday evening comfort food. Santé!
Homemade dauphinoise potatoes served with chicken with mushrooms and peas
Homemade dauphinoise potatoes for Sunday dinner

Moroccan chicken tagine with preserved lemons and olives

Moroccan chicken tagine with preserved lemons and olives
Something strange happened to our chilli plant. It went on holiday to my parents’ house for two weeks (while we holidayed in France for two weeks), and while sunning itself in their conservatory our humble little green jalapeños turned red! We bought the plant early last summer and had a generous crop of mild, but delicious jalapeño peppers for months. It stopped flowering over winter, but came back with gusto this summer and we began to use the green chillies again. I don’t know if the plant needed time to mature, or if it was the intense sun and warmth of the conservatory, but either way we returned to a glamorous plant bejewelled with fiery red chillies…
Homegrown chilli plant
We’ve used some of the red chillies in stir-fries and curries, or fried them with garlic and kale for a simple side dish, but we used the final one (for now) to flavour this gorgeous chicken tagine. This is an amalgamation of a few different tagine recipes, and is also inspired by a tagine I was served by friends and one we had in our riad in Marrakech last November. It combines sweet honey, sharp preserved lemons, hot chilli and salty olives with succulent chicken legs and, with the essential addition of ras el hanout (a North African blend of spices), feels like an exotic treat. It’s a great dish for serving a large group, but the chicken is also perfect as leftovers for lunch salads or sandwiches during the week. My favourite bit is the plentiful gravy that surrounds the chicken legs by the end of cooking, and in my opinion requires a great hunk of crusty bread for dipping.

One year ago:
Fennel and courgette salad (using red chilli, funnily enough!)
Sangria
Spanish prawns and chorizo
Ingredients for Moroccan chicken tagine
Ingredients (serves 4-5)
5 chicken legs (skin on)
4 small cloves of garlic, crushed
Thumb-size piece of ginger, grated
1 tbsp runny honey
1 tbsp cumin
½ tsp turmeric
1 generous tsp ras el hanout
1 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
5 tbsp olive oil
2 small white onions
1 red chilli
1 medium tomato
7 half slices of preserved lemons
15 green olives
450ml water

Method
1. Place the chicken in a large bowl or tub (or the container it came in!) and add the marinade ingredients (garlic, ginger, honey, cumin, turmeric, ras el hanout, salt, pepper and olive oil).
Adding the marinade ingredients to the chiken legs
Mix very well so all the chicken is coated and then cover and set aside to marinade at room temperature for as long as you can – at least an hour is ideal, but you can prepare as far in advance as the night before (in this case put the chicken in the fridge overnight but remember to take it out a few hours before cooking so it can come back to room temperature).
Marinading the chicken legs for Moroccan tagine

2. Preheat the oven to 180C/160C fan/Gas Mark 4. Thinly slice the onions and place at the bottom of your tagine.
Thinly sliced white onions for Moroccan chicken tagine
3. Prepare the chilli and tomato – deseed both and thinly slice.
Finely sliced tomato and red chilli
4. Heat a little olive oil in a frying pan and brown the chicken legs on both sides over a medium heat. You might need to do this in batches depending on the size of your pan. Don’t worry if the skin looks a bit black – this is the sugar in the honey caramelising – just don’t actually burn the flesh!
Browning the marinated chicken legs for the tagine
5. Arrange the chicken legs on top of the sliced onions in the tagine.
Arranging the chicken legs in the tagine
6. Scatter over the chilli, tomato, lemons and olives and pour in the water.
Adding other ingredients to the Moroccan chicken tagine 1
Adding other ingredients to the Moroccan chicken tagine 2
7. Place the lid on the tagine and cook in the oven for 1 hour.
Moroccan chicken tagine served with olive bread and green herb salad
Take the tagine straight to the table for dramatic effect, and serve with fresh, crusty bread or a big bowl of couscous, and a herby green salad.
Moroccan chicken tagine for Sunday dinner

Gazpacho

Gazpacho soup served with green pepper and croutons
If you’ve never eaten a chilled soup before, you’re going to just have to go with me on this one. It might seem very strange, or even off-putting, to those who have never tried it before, but believe me when I say that you are missing out and need to rectify that ASAP. Gazpacho, a southern Spanish tomato soup, is probably the most famous of the chilled soup family and it is one of my all-time favourite recipes. There are slight variations in ingredients and methods between the recipes available (some including peppers or bread, some soaking the ingredients overnight before blending, some adding stock or basil at the end), but this simple recipe is the one that my family has always used, passed down from my mum’s mum, and it is the best there is (unbiased family opinion).

Gazpacho makes use of the fresh, young allium produce that are available during the late summer. If you can’t get your hands on any young red onions or “green” garlic, as it is sometimes called, then you can use the regular varieties though you may want slightly reduce the quantity you add to the soup as it will be stronger and sharper in flavour. Err on the side of caution, since you can always add more in after the first blend, but you can’t take it back out at the end! This is the perfect seasonal recipe for a light lunch or supper, or to serve as a starter at a summer dinner party. However, I can also highly recommend having a large bowl of the soup the day after a night of excess – it’s zingy and refreshing, is reminiscent of comfort-food-hero hot tomato soup, has a high water content and is packed with vitamins.

One year ago:
Refreshing watermelon salad
Ingredients for homemade gazpacho
Ingredients (makes 4-6 servings)
450g ripe tomatoes
½ a cucumber
1 medium young red onion
3 cloves young garlic
450ml tomato juice
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
Salt and pepper
Green bell pepper and breadsticks or croutons to serve

Method
1. Begin by peeling and deseeding the tomatoes. The easiest way to do this is to plunge the tomatoes into a pan of boiling water for 30 seconds.
Boiling tomatoes to remove the skin
Remove and drain – the skin may already have started to blister – and leave to cool for a few minutes.
Tomatoes ready to be skinned
The skin should now very easily peel away, and then the tomatoes can be cut in half and the seeds either cut or scraped out.

2. Roughly chop the cucumber (including the peel and seeds), red onion and garlic and place in a large bowl.
Chopped red onion, garlic and cucumber
3. Add the peeled and deseeded tomatoes to the bowl, roughly chopped.
Adding peeled and seeded tomatoes to the gazpacho mix
4. Pour in the tomato juice, and add the olive oil, white wine vinegar and a generous season of salt and pepper.
Seasoning the gazpacho mix
5. Use a hand blender to blend the ingredients together. I like to keep the soup just a little bit chunky, but you can blend until you have the consistency you want – for a very smooth texture you will need to pass the mixture through a sieve. Taste the soup for seasoning (including vinegar, onion and garlic, not just salt and pepper) and adjust if necessary.
Blending the gazpacho soup
6. Chill the soup for at least 2 or 3 hours – this step is very important, so don’t skip it unless you are incredibly short on time, in which case having the tomato juice already chilled in the fridge is a top tip from my mum.
Blended gazpacho soup
Serve the soup chilled, in chilled bowls if you’re feeling extra fancy. Top with diced green pepper and, traditionally, homemade croutons either baked or fried in olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper. At home we always just broke up breadsticks to scatter over the soup, which is far less effort and a little healthier too. This time we spotted a box of olive oil crostini at the shops, which worked perfectly too.
Homemade chilled gazpacho soup 1
This soup will keep well in the fridge for up to 5 or 6 days, the flavours mingling and only improving with time.

Have you eaten chilled soups before, and if so what is your favourite type? Do you have your own gazpacho recipe? – I’d love to hear about it below!…

Tabbouleh

Tabbouleh salad
Is it salad season yet? Let’s just say it is and hurry in summer time, yes? Good. In that case we might as well kick off with one of my favourite ever salads: tabbouleh. Tabbouleh (or tabouli) is a vegetarian salad made from bulgur wheat, mixed with fresh herbs and vegetables and seasoned with plenty of lemon juice and olive oil. It originates from Lebanon and is traditionally served as part of a mezze alongside dishes like hummus, fattoush and baba ganoush. If you’re not familiar with bulgur wheat, but like grains like couscous or quinoa, then jump on board the bandwagon right now (except bulgur wheat is SO much better than quinoa!). Bulgur wheat is really easy to cook with as it just requires soaking in boiling water for about 15 to 20 minutes and you’ll be left with fairly substantial, chunky grains to flavour as you like.

This particular recipe for tabbouleh is one that my mum has made for years and years, and originally came from a Mollie Katzen cookbook. Mollie Katzen is an American chef and cookbook writer, and is well known for her beautifully illustrated (by her) vegetarian cookbooks like The Enchanted Broccoli Forest (best name for a vegetarian cookbook ever right?). This tabbouleh recipe is from The Moosewood Cookbook and has just been slightly adjusted by both my mum and then me over the years. Feel free to adjust the recipe again to your taste – whether you like it to be sharper with extra lemon juice, herbier with the addition of more fresh herbs or saltier with some sliced olives mixed through.
Ingredients for tabbouleh salad
Ingredients (makes 6-8 generous portions)
250g (1 heaped cup) bulgur wheat
360ml (1½ cups) boiling water
1½ tsp salt
1½-2 lemons, juiced
2 garlic cloves, crushed or very finely chopped
4 spring onions
Small bunch parsley
2-3 tomatoes
½ medium cucumber
Extra virgin olive oil
Freshly ground black pepper
Optional extra ideas: feta cheese, chickpeas, olives, avocado, fresh mint

Method
1. Place the bulgur wheat in a large bowl with the salt and pour over the boiling water. Give it a quick mix and then cover the bowl with a large plate. Leave the bulgur wheat for 15-20 minutes until it has soaked up all the water.
Soaking the bulgar wheat
2. Add the lemon juice, garlic and a few generous glugs of olive oil and mix well. Chill in the fridge for a few hours.
Soaked bulgar wheat with garlic, lemon juice and olive oil
3. Finely chop the spring onions and parsley, and chop the tomatoes and cucumber into small chunks (I recommend removing the watery middle of the cucumber – you can do this very easily by halving the cucumber length-ways and using a teaspoon to scrape out the middle).
Chopped vegetables for tabbouleh salad
4. Add all the vegetables to the chilled bulgur wheat and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
Adding vegetables to the bulgar wheat
Mixing the vegetables through the bulgar wheat
This is a great side salad to serve alongside a spread of cheese and bread, or grilled meat, fish or vegetables.
Tabbouleh salad
It also makes a super packed lunch, which you can bulk up with some extras like avocado, feta cheese, chickpeas or even some roasted vegetables. The tabbouleh will keep very well in the fridge for 4 or 5 days.
Tabbouleh salad served with ripe avocado for lunch