Mango ice-cream with raspberry ripple

Stirring fresh mango puree through whipped cream
Happy New Year from Proof of the Pudding! Or is it bad form to wish you that when January is already nearly over? January can be a hard month, especially where I live as we know there are still a couple of months of dark mornings and evenings to get through, and if we’re to get a bad snow storm this year then it’s yet to come (EDIT: I spoke to soon, it seems this weekend is our first of the season). Sometimes you feel ready to jump into January with gusto: stocking up the cupboards, fridge and fruit bowl with healthy foods, pulling on your gym gear to work off that Christmas dinner and diving back into work at 9am on Monday morning, to-do list at the ready. But sometimes it takes a few sluggish days, or even weeks, to get back into a routine and not want to rush home every evening and immediately get your pyjamas on. However your January started, I hope it’s ending well. Let’s all look forward to February and longer days and Pancake Tuesday!

Now I’m not going to try and pretend that this is in any way a healthy recipe (see double cream and sugar), but it’s certainly refreshing and might be a welcome change from all that trifle and chocolate and Christmas pudding. This is also a satisfyingly straightforward ice-cream recipe which doesn’t require you to have an ice-cream maker (although if you do then by all means use it). The freeze-blend-freeze method ensures that the ice crystals are broken up and gives a smooth texture. Make sure you buy very ripe mangos for this recipe, for both texture and flavour. The squishier the better really. In particular, if you can find alphonso mangos these have an incredible, sweet flavour.

One year ago:
Minestrone soup
Courgette antipasto rolls
Ingredients for homemade mango ice-cream with raspberry ripple
Ingredients
3 large ripe mangos (approximately 1kg)
300ml double cream
100g caster sugar
¼ tsp vanilla extract (optional)
50g frozen raspberries, defrosted

Method
1. Peel and chop the mangos into chunks.
Peeled and chopped ripe mangos
2. Blend the mango to achieve a smooth puree.
Blended fresh mango puree
3. In a large bowl add the cream to the sugar and vanilla extract.
Pouring cream into caster sugar 1
Pouring cream into caster sugar 2
Pouring cream into caster sugar 3
4. Whisk the cream and sugar together until loosely whipped – be very careful not to over whip here.
Whipped double cream, caster sugar and vanilla extract
5. Add the mango puree to the whipped cream and mix well until completely combined.
Adding mango puree to the whipped cream
Stirring fresh mango puree through whipped cream
6. Pour the ice-cream mixture into a loaf tin or tupperware tub and freeze for about 3 hours, or until just frozen.
Ice-cream mix ready to be frozen
7. While the ice-cream is in the freezer, make the raspberry ripple by simply pressing the defrosted raspberries through a sieve to remove the seeds.

8. After a few hours in the freezer, scoop or cut the ice-cream out into a food processor or blender. Blend until smooth again.
Blending the ice-cream half way through freezing
9. Pour the mixture back into the tin or tub.
Mango ice-cream in a loaf tin for freezing
10. Drizzle over the raspberry puree and use a skewer to ripple it through the soft ice-cream. Freeze again for a few hours, or until ready to eat.
Adding raspberry puree to the soft mango ice-cream
Rippling raspberry sauce through the mango ice-cream
Take the ice-cream out the freezer about 10 minutes before serving to soften up and make scooping a little easier. Serve with fresh mango or raspberries, or just eat as is. With a spoon. Out the tub. What January diet?
Homemade mango ice-cream with raspberry ripple

Autumn fruit crumble

Seasonal autumn fruits for a crumble
One of my first ever recipes on this blog was for a rhubarb crumble, spiced with star anise and vanilla and served with homemade custard. While rhubarb crumble is a celebration of spring, this recipe is the ultimate, turbo-charged celebration of autumn. I mentioned the combination in that first post about crumble: a mixture of apples, pears, plums and brambles. These fruits are the absolute joys of autumn produce and come in a wide variety throughout the season, so you can make this recipe slightly differently each time. Use blackberries instead of wild brambles (though picking wild brambles is another joy of autumn in itself), use eating apples instead of cooking apples, use whatever types of ripe plums you can find at the shops.

One ingredient I highly recommend making the effort to get hold of is a bag of damsons, which are tiny darkest-blue plums that have an incredible jammy texture when cooked. They’re also quite sour after cooking, which balances out all the sweetness in the rest of the crumble. They are difficult to find in supermarkets, but you should have better luck getting them at a greengrocer.

I wished I’d had ground almonds in the cupboard when I made the crumble topping, as I think almonds go so well with fruits like pears and plums. Add a few tablespoons to the mixture with the oats if you have some. This makes a very generous quantity of crumble topping, which freezes very well, so if you don’t end up using it all just pop the remainder in a labelled plastic bag and store in the freezer for another time.

One year ago:
Meatloaf
Stewed apples and plums
Ingredients for seasonal autumn fruit crumbe
Ingredients (makes one very large crumble to feed a crowd)
150g cold unsalted butter
250g plain flour
75g soft light brown sugar
50g oats
1.5kg autumn fruit (approximately – I used 3 cooking apples, 3 pears, 8 greengages and 3-4 handfuls each of damsons and brambles)
2 tbsp granulated sugar

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 180C/160C fan/Gas Mark 4. Cut the butter into small cubes.
Chilled butter cut into small cubes
2. Add the butter to the plain flour and rub together with your fingers until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
Adding chilled butter to the plain flour
Rubbing the cold butter into the plain flour
3. Add the sugar and mix well.
Adding light brown sugar to the butter and flour mix
4. Add the oats, and ground almonds if using, and mix again. Set the crumble topping aside.
Adding oats to the crumble topping mix
5. Prepare the fruit by peeling, coring and chopping the apples and pears into chunks and removing the stones from the plums and halving. Arrange the fruit in a large, deep ovenproof dish.
Preparing the seasonal autumn fruit 1
6. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons of sugar over the fruit.
Sprinkling sugar over the seasonal autumn fruit
7. Pile the crumble topping over the fruit, pressing down gently with the back of a spoon.
Topping the autumn fruit crumble 1
Autumn fruit crumble ready to bake
8. Bake for 30-40 minutes until the crumble is golden brown and the juice from the fruit is bubbling up to the surface.
Close up of Seasonal autumn fruit crumble
Serve with lashings of warm vanilla custard, with the curtains drawn, the heating on and surrounded by flickering candles. Comfort food done right.
Seasonal autumn fruit crumble served with vanilla custard
Seasonal autumn fruit crumble

Individual summer puddings

Homemade summer pudding served with creme fraiche and currants 1
Summer pudding is one of my all-time favourite desserts; I think it could even give the chocolate fondant a run for its money. The pudding has a nostalgic, exciting feeling for me, partly because it meant that the berries and currants at my dad’s allotment were ripe and ready to be used which in turn signaled that summer was well and truly here, but also because I think it’s the first properly impressive pudding that I learnt to make. It’s a sinfully easy recipe, but turning out a perfectly set pudding and slicing into the stunning pink exterior to reveal the jumble of different summer berries inside is a very satisfying feeling indeed.

This is based on a Katie Stuart recipe (the kitchen goddess that our household regularly turn to for instruction, and who I’ve mentioned many times before), though she makes one large pudding to serve about 6 people. If you’re feeding a crowd then I’d highly recommend this – just double to quantities of fruit and sugar below to fill a 2 pint pudding basin (about 1.1 litres) and you will need to use a bit more of the loaf of bread. If, like me, you’re catering for less people then these make the cutest little treats.

A few tips before we begin: make sure you do use stale bread, so remember to buy a loaf in advance. I bought mine two days before I made these and it worked perfectly. Use whatever combination of summer berries that you prefer or have available, but try to use more redcurrants than other berries. For example, I used 180g redcurrants, 100g raspberries, 100g blackcurrants and 70g raspberries. Katie Stuart recommends 450g redcurrants, 225g raspberries and 225g strawberries for one large pudding (double this recipe). You do need to leave the puddings in the fridge overnight so that they set properly so no short cuts here I’m afraid! Inevitably you will be left with crusts and small cuttings from the slices of bread – throw them into a food processor or blender and blitz to breadcrumbs. They can be stored in airtight containers in the freezer for months and used as you require for recipes.
Turning scraps of stale white bread into bread crumbs to freeze
One year ago:
Stuffed courgettes
Ingredients for summer pudding
Ingredients (makes 3 individual puddings)
One loaf of stale white bread (you will use about half of it – the rest will make perfect toast!)
450g summer berries
70g castor sugar
Crème fraiche and extra berries to serve

Method
1. Rinse 3 small pudding basins (150ml capacity each) with cold water and thinly cut about half the loaf into 1cm slices – you can always cut more later if you need it.
Sliced stale white bread for summer pudding
2. Trim the crusts from the slices of bread and cut 6 circles – 3 small circles for the bottom of the bowls and 3 larger ones to cover the top – and enough wedges to cover the sides of the basins. Firmly press the small circles into the bottom of the basins and do the same with the wedges round the sides. Make sure there are no gaps at all in the bread lining and plug any with small pieces of the leftover bread.
Removing the crusts from slices of stale white bread
Lining mini pudding basins with stale white bread
3. Put the fruit and sugar into a small saucepan and cover with a lid. Place over a gentle heat for 5 minutes until the fruit has softened.
Summer berries and castor sugar
Summer berries and castor sugar cooked until the fruit has softened
4. Spoon the hot fruit into the pots, ensuring an even distribution of the different types of berries. Fill the basins right to the top, pouring over as much of the juice as possible.
Cooked summer berries ready to fill pudding basins
Filling the bread lined pudding basins with summer berries
Bread lined pudding basins filled with summer berries 3
If you have any extra juice left at the end then don’t throw it away – you can pour a little extra liquid over the puddings once they are turned out, especially useful if there are any little pieces of bread that haven’t been completely soaked through.

5. Place the basins on a large plate or tray (some of the juice will probably spill over the top so this keeps your fridge shelves clean!) and gently press the last 3 circles of bread on top of the puddings.
Topping the pudding basins with circles of stale white bread
6. Put small plates or saucers on top of each pudding and weight down with tins or other suitably-sized heavy objects. Refrigerate the puddings at least overnight.
Weighting down the individual summer puddings
7. When you’re ready to serve, run a knife around the edge of each of the puddings and tip out onto small plates. If you have saved some, spoon over a little extra juice.
Homemade summer pudding 1
Serve with a generous dollop of crème fraiche and a few fresh berries or currants.
Homemade summer pudding served with creme fraiche and currants 2
Sweet, soft, sharp and undeniably summery.
Cutting into the mini summer pudding
What do you like to do with summer berries? Do you have any favourite, nostalgic puddings?

Chocolate fondant

Ok first, click here and press play. Now I have your attention let’s continue…

It’s either the saviour or the downfall of Masterchef contestants everywhere. If perfected then in the words of Gregg Wallace “Ah, mate, I tell you what, that’s the sort of thing I would dip my head in”. If it doesn’t work then there’s no bigger disappointment and a contestant’s dream will be fading fast. But! I’m here to tell you that it need not be the downfall of the home cook. Sure, it takes a bit of time, and you need to stick to the recipe instructions meticulously, but this is my go-to impressive pudding for a dinner party and it has worked every time. I really hope you give this recipe a go, and please let me know if you do – it’s such a satisfying dessert to make. Good luck!
Ingredients for melt-in-the-middle chocolate fondants
Ingredients (serves 4)
25g butter, melted
4 tsp cocoa powder
100g dark chocolate
100g butter
Large shot of chocolate liquor (or any liquor of your choice)
2 medium eggs, plus two extra yolks
100g caster sugar
100g plain flour
Double cream or ice-cream to serve

Method
1. Brush the inside of four small pudding tins or ramekins with the melted butter.
Pudding tins to be prepared for chocolate fondants
Use upward strokes with a pastry brush to line the sides – this helps the puddings to rise nicely.
Brushing the inside of the pudding tin in upward strokes 1
Brushing the inside of the pudding tin in upward strokes 2
Place in the freezer for 10 minutes, or in the fridge for 30 minutes, and brush on a second layer of butter when the first has hardened. Chill again.
Double line the pudding tins with melted butter
2. Put a teaspoon of cocoa powder into each tin, shake and tip out in order to completely coat the inside – this stops the puddings from sticking to the tins and will guarantee your little cakes will tip out easily after cooking.
Sprinkle cocoa powder onto the butter to line the tins
3. Melt the chocolate and butter in a bain-marie and set aside to cool to room temperature.
Melting dark chocolate and butter in a bain-marie
Melted chocolate and butter cooling to room temperature
4. Add a shot of your chosen liquor to the chocolate mixture and stir well.
Adding chocolate liquor to the melted dark chocolate and butter 1
Adding chocolate liquor to the melted dark chocolate and butter 2
Chocolate liquor will result in a deeper, richer chocolate flavour, but coffee or mint liquor, Cointreau or brandy would all work as well.

5. Use an electric whisk to beat the eggs and sugar together.
Eggs and sugar to be whisked for chocolate fondants
You need to achieve a really thick, bubbly texture so keep whisking until the mixture turns considerably lighter in colour and the batter leaves a trail from the whisks.
Beating the eggs and sugar to form a thick fluffy mixture
You can of course use a hand whisk, but be warned, you will need guns of steel.

6. Sift the flour into the egg mixture and beat to combine.
Sifting plain flour into the eggs and sugar mixture
Plain flour sifted into the eggs and sugar mixture
Beating the flour into the eggs and sugar
7. Add the chocolate a bit at a time, beating well to ensure that it incorporates evenly into the batter.
Starting to add the chocolate mixture to the fondant batter
Chocolate and butter fully combined into the fondant batter
8. Now you’re ready to fill the pudding tins or ramekins. I find that the easiest and most mess-free way to do this is to transfer the batter into a jug and then pour the mixture into the tins from there.
Chocolate fondant batter ready to be poured into tins
Fill the tins evenly and then chill in the fridge until ready to cook – wait at least 30 minutes, but you can leave them overnight if you’re preparing ahead.
Pudding tins filled with fondant batter
9. Preheat the oven to 180C/160C fan/Gas Mark 4. Place the puddings on a baking tray and bake for 12 minutes. I have always found that this timing works perfectly, so I trust it every time and don’t let myself be tempted to take them out sooner or leave them in longer.
Chocolate fondants after baking
The puddings should rise out the tins slightly and be well cooked round the outside, but soft in the centre.

10. Gently tip the fondants out onto small plates or bowls (this should be easy due to the double layer of butter and the cocoa powder in steps 1 and 2).
Double chocolate fondant
Serve with lashings of double cream or good quality vanilla ice-cream.
Chocolate fondant served with double cream 1
Chocolate fondant served with double cream 2
Sit back and revel in the ooh-s and aah-s that will ensue as your guests cut into the fondants and the chocolate centre oozes out. To. Die. For.

Christmas pudding

Wrapping up the Christmas pudding for storing
Christmas pudding after the first steam
I know, I know: IT’S NOT EVEN DECEMBER YET, SHUT UP ABOUT CHRISTMAS. I feel ya. I’m a great believer in no Christmas decorations, shopping or music before December. Don’t get me wrong, I bloody love Christmas and all the festivities that go with it. The moment December 1st arrives I will be all Micheal Bublé on repeat, festively scented candles and wreath-making. Let’s savor the festive period for a few weeks, packing in as many glasses of mulled wine and repeats of Elf as possible. But let’s not drag it out too long until the sight of another mince pie makes you feel a bit queasy and the sound of Mariah Carey singing All I Want For Christmas makes you want to smash your head off a wall. Nobody needs that.

However, there are quite a few Christmas recipes that need weeks, if not months, of storing and maturing before they are ready, so in this case we’ll make an exception and think about Christmas early. The best of these recipes is, of course, Christmas pudding. This is my Grandma’s recipe and I can safely say that it is the best and only Christmas pudding recipe you will ever want or need. It’s an all-in-one Christmas dessert, with sweet dried fruits, festive spices and warming alcohol.

For me, there is something happy and sentimental about Christmas puddings. I love the traditions that come with making it, that are either old (hiding a sliver coin inside, which brings wealth in the new year to the finder) or new (for example, Colum and I having to nearly set fire to a kitchen each year during the flaming, or spiking the pudding with brandy from a syringe as it matures); the stories of forgotten Christmas puddings discovered at the back of the cupboards after years, which are still edible and in fact the tastiest ones of all; and the fun of the pudding on Christmas Day when the lights are dimmed, the flaming pudding is ceremoniously presented and my little cousin manages to pack away 5 large portions.

Traditionally, Christmas pudding is made on “Stir-up Sunday”, which is the last Sunday before the season of Advent and this year it is Sunday 23rd November. That’s this Sunday people! Also traditionally, everyone in the household has to give the mixture a stir and I guess this is another reason why I love this recipe so much. Gather everyone together this Sunday, fill your house with an early treat of Christmas smells and then enjoy the satisfaction when you pull out your matured homemade Christmas pudding in four and a half weeks time!
Ingredients for Christmas pudding
Ingredients (makes one small pudding)
85g plain flour
½ tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp grated nutmeg
½ tsp salt
125g vegetarian suet – it doesn’t need to be vegetarian but I like to be prepared just in case
85g breadcrumbs
175g currants
175g raisins
125g sultanas
125g dark brown demerara sugar
85g chopped mixed peel
125g grated apples
Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon
1 large egg
½ small wineglass of brandy
A bottle or can of stout
A well-washed silver coin

Method
1. Sift the flour, spices and salt into a large bowl.
Flour, spices and salt for sifting
Sieved flour, spices and salt
2. Add the suet, sugar, bread crumbs, dried fruit and peel, and mix very well.
Dry ingredients for Christmas pudding
Mixed dry ingredients for Christmas pudding
3. Add the grated apple and lemon rind, and mix well again.
Adding grated apple to the Christmas pudding mix
4. Beat the egg and add in, then add the lemon juice and brandy, and mix well one more time.
Adding brandy to the Christmas pudding mix
5. Add a little stout until the mixture is quite moist (but not too wet!). Usually a substantial amount of the bottle is leftover so one lucky helper will get to polish it off…
Grease your bowl well. Put about half the mixture in and then pop in your clean silver coin (don’t forget to remind everyone that there is a coin hidden inside when it comes to serving…we don’t want any chipped teeth!).
Hiding a silver coin in the Christmas pudding
Fill the bowl with the remaining mixture.
Christmas pudding mixture
6. Cover the pudding with cloth, foil or baking paper (or a combination) and tie tightly with string to keep out the steam.
Preparing the Christmas pudding for the first steam 1
Preparing the Christmas pudding for the first steam 2
Place on top of a small plate, in a large pan and fill with a few inches of water. Cover with a lid and steam on a low heat for 8 hours – keep an eye on the water level to make sure it doesn’t boil dry.
First steam of the Christmas pudding
7. When cool, wrap well in a few layers of new foil, baking paper or wax paper and tie tightly with string again. Store for at least 4 or 5 weeks, or any time longer!
Wrapping up the Christmas pudding for storing
8. On the day you are serving the pudding, re-steam in the same way for 3 hours. Top with a sprig of holly, flame with some lightly warmed brandy and serve with cream or, even better, homemade white sauce.

….and of course I can’t let this post go by without pointing out the adorable, and aptly lettered, bowl that I made this year’s pudding in, which was bought for me by my dad…

Easy apple tarts

Quick apple tart served with vanilla ice cream
This is a great little recipe if you need a dessert in a hurry. It’s basically a cheats apple tart, and isn’t much more than an assembly job, especially if you use ready-made puff pastry. It’s a great way to use up eating apples, of which there are many different British varieties in season at the moment. Don’t use cooking apples as they will become mush during the baking, but any eating apple will do – ours actually came from an overhanging tree in the Mitchell’s back garden (with neighbour permission of course!). Lemon juice stops the apple slices from browning and the brown sugar brings the sweetness back up and adds a caramelised toffee flavour. Then it’s just into the oven for a quick bake and a little glaze of jam at the end. Done and dusted in half an hour.

A special mention has to go to Natasha and Josh for their gift to me of a beautiful jar of homemade plum jam – with plums from the garden and all. The perfect topping for these fruity little tarts.
Ingredients for quick apple tarts
Ingredients (makes 6-8 small tarts)
400g puff pastry (or follow the quantities and method here)
4-5 eating apples
Half a lemon
2 tsp soft brown sugar
1 egg, beaten
2 tbsp plum or apricot jam

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 200C/180C fan/Gas Mark 6. Roll your pastry out to about half a centimetre thick. Using either a pastry cutter or a small bowl and a knife, cut out rounds of pastry and lay onto a baking tray lined with baking parchment. You want the size of the pastry circles to be a little bigger than the height of the apples. Pop into the fridge while you prepare the apples.
Rolling the homemade puff pastry
Cutting rounds of puff pastry
2. Cut the apples into thin slices and toss in the brown sugar and the juice of half a lemon.
Thinly sliced apple sprinkled with lemon juice and soft brown sugar
3. Arrange the apple slices on top of the pastry circles, overlapping in the middle. Brush a little egg around the edges of the pastry and bake for 8-10 minutes until the pastry has puffed up and the apple has started to caramelise.
Arranging the apple slices on the puff pastry
Baked apple tarts before glazing
4. While the pastries bake, heat the jam gently. Use a pastry brush to dab the melted jam over the top of the baked tarts.
Homemade plum jam
Heating the plum jam for glazing the tarts
Quick apple tarts
Serve warm from the oven with vanilla ice cream, or leave to cool and have with a steaming hot mug of tea.
Quick apple tart served with vanilla ice cream

Stewed Apples and Plums

Stewed apples and plums with natural yogurt and ground cinnamon
Just a quick little recipe today, but very much in-keeping with the autumnal theme. Stewing is a great way to use up a large batch of fruit, and means that the fruit keeps well for much longer than it normally would. At this time of year, gluts of apple are a common occurrence and we picked an enormous crop from my grandparents’ cooking apple tree last month. Although I used some of the apples in my mini puff pastry apple pies and a couple for a savoury apple sauce with roast pork belly, most have been used in three separate batches of my mum’s simple recipe for stewed apples. In the final lot I also had some plums in the fruit bowl which hadn’t ripened well, but are absolutely perfect once they’ve been lightly stewed. You can make this without the plums, using just apples, or you could add some pears, or even a handful of blackberries right at the end. Lovely autumnal fare.

Note: this recipe makes a very large quantity, so adjust depending on how much you want or how much fruit you have.
Ingredients for stewed apples and plums
Ingredients
1.35kg fruit (I used about 900g cooking apples, and 450g plums)
550ml water
340g sugar
2 handfuls of raisins

Method
1. Peel and core the apples, then cut into small chunks. De-stone the plums and slice into eighths.
Chopping cooking apples and plums
Chopped plums and cooking apples
2. Heat the water and sugar until boiling.
Boiling water and sugar for stewed fruit
3. Add the apple, plums and raisins and bring back to the boil. Simmer for about 3 minutes and turn off the heat. Leave to cool.
Adding fruit to the sugar syrup
Stewed apples and plums
There are lots of options for your stewed fruit now, depending on how big a batch you’ve made! Use immediately while still warm, or leave to cool in the pan and then transfer to a tupperware tub…
Cooled stewed fruit
This will now keep in the fridge for at least a week, or in the freezer for a few months. The fruit can be spooned over porridge or cereals for breakfast…
Stewed fruit with granola for breakfast
…or topped with natural yogurt and a sprinkle of ground cinnamon either for a light breakfast or a filling snack…
Stewed apples and plums with natural yogurt and ground cinnamon
…of course, the options are endless. Re-heat gently and spoon over vanilla ice-cream, use to top meringues and cream similar to what I did with my spiced rhubarb compote, or smash the meringues up with the fruit and cream to create an autumnal Eton Mess.