Salted toffee brownies

Salted toffee or caramel brownies
Ok, so I’ll be the first to admit that this recipe isn’t going to win any brownie (seewhatIdidthere?) points for originality – the combination of sea salt and caramel or toffee, essentially sweet and salty, is not going to be a revelation to you. However, this is what I’ve been baking lately and goddammit if it isn’t delicious, so it feels only fair to share the recipe in case you’re in need of a ridiculously indulgent treat. Because that’s exactly what this is, and it will satisfy any chocolate cravings instantly.

Last month we were given a joint birthday hamper filled with some amazing goodies, including this toffee crème:
Toffee creme
(There’s also a mocha crème that we haven’t opened yet, which I think shows incredible restraint. When that day comes….uhhhhhh.)

Anyway, this. Is. The. Bomb. It’s brilliant on top of vanilla ice cream, and obviously it can be eaten straight out the jar with a teaspoon (been there, done that), but I thought I’d have a go at using it in some baking, and salted brownies was the obvious answer. This recipe is based on the best brownie recipe ever. Of course, you don’t need to have this particular product to make the recipe – you could use any caramel or toffee that you already have or can find in the shops, as long as it’s soft enough to swirl through the brownie mix.

One year ago:
Chocolate fondant
Rhubarb curd and rhubarb cordial

Two years ago:
Banana bread
Triple chocolate cheesecake
Slow cooked BBQ pulled pork
Ingredients for salted caramel brownies
Ingredients (makes about 16 brownies)
190g dark chocolate
190g unsalted butter, plus a little extra for greasing
3 medium eggs
250g caster sugar
½ tsp vanilla extract
115g plain flour
½ tsp sea salt flakes, plus a few extra pinches for the top
3 or 4 tbsp of toffee crème (or other toffee/caramel product!)

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 180C/160C fan/Gas Mark 4. Grease a 20x20cm baking tin with a knob of butter and line it with baking parchment, leaving a little paper hanging over two of the sides – this will make it much easier to lift the brownie out at the end.
Greasing and lining a baking tray for brownies
2. Break the chocolate into small pieces and place in a pan with the butter. Cook over a very gentle heat until everything is completely melted, then leave off the heat for about 5-10 minutes to cool a little.
Butter and dark chocolate to be melted
Melted dark chocolate and butter
Melted dark chocolate and butter
3. Whisk together the eggs, caster sugar and vanilla extract, then pour in the slightly cooled chocolate mixture and mix well.
Eggs, caster sugar and vanilla extract
Beating together the eggs, caster sugar and vanilla extract
Mixing the wet ingredients together
4. Place the flour and salt in a large bowl and, if you’re lazy like me and can’t be bothered sieving it, give it a quick whisk to aerate the flour and remove any lumps.
Whisking plain flour and salt
5. Pour the wet mixture into the dry ingredients and mix until well combined.
Adding the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients
Brownie mix
6. Spoon the brownie batter into the lined tin and spread out evenly.
Pouring the brownie mix into the lined baking tray
7. Dollop teaspoons of your chosen toffee or caramel around the top of the brownie and swirl gently with a skewer. Sprinkle with a couple of pinches of sea salt flakes.
Adding spoons of toffee cream to the brownie mix
Swirling caramel through the brownie mix
Sprinkling the brownies with Maldon sea salt flakes
8. Bake for 20-25 minutes until crisp and cracking on top, but still squidgy in the middle. Remove from the tin using the handy excess pieces of baking parchment and leave to cool on a wire rack.
Brownies out the oven ready to cool
Enjoy with a big glass of cold milk and a satisfied groan.
Salted toffee or caramel brownies
Salted toffee or caramel brownies

Chocolate fondant

Ok first, click here and press play. Now I have your attention let’s continue…

It’s either the saviour or the downfall of Masterchef contestants everywhere. If perfected then in the words of Gregg Wallace “Ah, mate, I tell you what, that’s the sort of thing I would dip my head in”. If it doesn’t work then there’s no bigger disappointment and a contestant’s dream will be fading fast. But! I’m here to tell you that it need not be the downfall of the home cook. Sure, it takes a bit of time, and you need to stick to the recipe instructions meticulously, but this is my go-to impressive pudding for a dinner party and it has worked every time. I really hope you give this recipe a go, and please let me know if you do – it’s such a satisfying dessert to make. Good luck!
Ingredients for melt-in-the-middle chocolate fondants
Ingredients (serves 4)
25g butter, melted
4 tsp cocoa powder
100g dark chocolate
100g butter
Large shot of chocolate liquor (or any liquor of your choice)
2 medium eggs, plus two extra yolks
100g caster sugar
100g plain flour
Double cream or ice-cream to serve

Method
1. Brush the inside of four small pudding tins or ramekins with the melted butter.
Pudding tins to be prepared for chocolate fondants
Use upward strokes with a pastry brush to line the sides – this helps the puddings to rise nicely.
Brushing the inside of the pudding tin in upward strokes 1
Brushing the inside of the pudding tin in upward strokes 2
Place in the freezer for 10 minutes, or in the fridge for 30 minutes, and brush on a second layer of butter when the first has hardened. Chill again.
Double line the pudding tins with melted butter
2. Put a teaspoon of cocoa powder into each tin, shake and tip out in order to completely coat the inside – this stops the puddings from sticking to the tins and will guarantee your little cakes will tip out easily after cooking.
Sprinkle cocoa powder onto the butter to line the tins
3. Melt the chocolate and butter in a bain-marie and set aside to cool to room temperature.
Melting dark chocolate and butter in a bain-marie
Melted chocolate and butter cooling to room temperature
4. Add a shot of your chosen liquor to the chocolate mixture and stir well.
Adding chocolate liquor to the melted dark chocolate and butter 1
Adding chocolate liquor to the melted dark chocolate and butter 2
Chocolate liquor will result in a deeper, richer chocolate flavour, but coffee or mint liquor, Cointreau or brandy would all work as well.

5. Use an electric whisk to beat the eggs and sugar together.
Eggs and sugar to be whisked for chocolate fondants
You need to achieve a really thick, bubbly texture so keep whisking until the mixture turns considerably lighter in colour and the batter leaves a trail from the whisks.
Beating the eggs and sugar to form a thick fluffy mixture
You can of course use a hand whisk, but be warned, you will need guns of steel.

6. Sift the flour into the egg mixture and beat to combine.
Sifting plain flour into the eggs and sugar mixture
Plain flour sifted into the eggs and sugar mixture
Beating the flour into the eggs and sugar
7. Add the chocolate a bit at a time, beating well to ensure that it incorporates evenly into the batter.
Starting to add the chocolate mixture to the fondant batter
Chocolate and butter fully combined into the fondant batter
8. Now you’re ready to fill the pudding tins or ramekins. I find that the easiest and most mess-free way to do this is to transfer the batter into a jug and then pour the mixture into the tins from there.
Chocolate fondant batter ready to be poured into tins
Fill the tins evenly and then chill in the fridge until ready to cook – wait at least 30 minutes, but you can leave them overnight if you’re preparing ahead.
Pudding tins filled with fondant batter
9. Preheat the oven to 180C/160C fan/Gas Mark 4. Place the puddings on a baking tray and bake for 12 minutes. I have always found that this timing works perfectly, so I trust it every time and don’t let myself be tempted to take them out sooner or leave them in longer.
Chocolate fondants after baking
The puddings should rise out the tins slightly and be well cooked round the outside, but soft in the centre.

10. Gently tip the fondants out onto small plates or bowls (this should be easy due to the double layer of butter and the cocoa powder in steps 1 and 2).
Double chocolate fondant
Serve with lashings of double cream or good quality vanilla ice-cream.
Chocolate fondant served with double cream 1
Chocolate fondant served with double cream 2
Sit back and revel in the ooh-s and aah-s that will ensue as your guests cut into the fondants and the chocolate centre oozes out. To. Die. For.

Chocolate and red wine birthday cake

Decorating the chocolate and red wine celebration cake with rainbow sprinkles 1
The credit for this cake goes 100% to Deb from the Smitten Kitchen blog. This is one of my favourite food blogs out there, and when I saw her picture of this cake on Instagram a few weeks ago I knew straight away that I had to make it. Happily, it coincided with my other half’s birthday and with his only request for his cake being “chocolate, chocolate, chocolate” this seemed like it was the only and ideal solution.
Chocolate and red wine birthday cake with rainbow sprinkles
This cake was a complete success. Although it’s really all about the piles of sweet chocolatey buttercream on top, the sponge itself was delicious. It’s dense, almost like a brownie, but the overall effect is not too overwhelming as it’s a fairly thin sponge cut into small pieces. Instead of using buttermilk as in the original recipe, I went for Deb’s suggestion of substituting for red wine. On the day I baked it, we didn’t think the red wine flavour came through strongly, although it did add some much needed acidity to cut through the rich chocolate flavour, but on the second and third days after mellowing in the fridge you could definitely taste the red wine. If you’re baking this cake for little ones (it would be the perfect birthday cake for a kids party, and the quantities can easily be increased to make a larger cake) then just switch back to the buttermilk.
Ingredients for chocolate and red wine celebration cake
Ingredients (cuts into 12-16 small pieces)
85g softened butter
145g soft dark brown sugar
25g caster sugar
1 large egg, plus one large egg yolk
1 tsp vanilla extract
175ml red wine
40g cocoa powder
125g plain flour
¼ tsp bicarbonate of soda
½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt

55g dark chocolate
180g icing sugar
115g softened butter
Pinch of salt
1-2 tbsp whole milk or cream
½ tsp vanilla extract
Topping of your choice – I used rainbow chocolate beans from Sainsburys

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 175C/150C fan/Gas Mark 3. Grease a 20x20cm cake tin and line it with a square of baking parchment.
Greasing and lining a 20x20cm cake tin
2. Tip the soft butter and both dark and caster sugars into a large bowl.
Butter and two sugars to be creamed
Use a hand whisk to mix until the mixture is fluffy and turns lighter in colour.
Creamed butter and two sugars
3. Add the egg, yolk and vanilla extract and beat again until fully combined.
Adding one egg and one yolk to the creamed butter and sugars
Eggs, sugars and butter
4. Pour in the red wine and mix again. At this point I had a minor panic as the mixture looked split. However, Deb says in her original recipe “don’t worry if the batter looks uneven”, so I decided to put my full trust in her and continue. Sift the dry ingredients (cocoa powder, flour, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder and salt) into the bowl and give one final mix to combine.
Sifting the dry ingredients into the wet cake mix
And lo and behold I had a smooth, unctuous cake batter. Never doubt the Smitten Kitchen.
Final chocolate and red wine cake mix
5. Pour the batter into your cake tin and smooth the top out with a palette knife or the back of a spoon.
Cake batter ready to be poured into the cake tin
Chocolate and red wine cake ready to be baked
6. Bake for 25 minutes until a skewer comes out the middle of the cake clean. Place the tin on a wire rack to cool for 10 minutes, then turn the sponge out to cool completely.
Cooling the chocolate and red wine celebration cake in the tin
Turning the chocolate and red wine cake out onto a wire rack to cool completely
7. While the cake cools make the icing. Melt the dark chocolate in a bain-marie and then set aside to cool to room temperature. This is important, because if the chocolate is still hot when you add it to the buttercream then it will melt the butter and ruin your icing.
Melting dark chocolat in a bain marie
Melted dark chocolate for the icing
8. Whisk the butter and icing sugar together until very light and fluffy. Don’t skimp on the time you give to this step as this is what gives the frosting a gorgeous texture.
Butter and icing sugar to make the frosting
Whipped butter and icing sugar for the chocolate frosting
9. Add the melted chocolate, salt, milk or cream and vanilla extract and whip again for 5 minutes until well combined.
Adding dark chocolate to the buttercream icing
10. Carefully move the sponge onto your serving plate or board and pile the frosting in the middle of the cake.
Chocolate buttercream icing piled on to the chocolate sponge
Using a palette knife or the back of a butter knife spread the chocolate buttercream over the cake. Start in the middle and push the icing towards the edge of the cake, swirling as you go.
Spreading the chocolate buttercream onto the chocolate sponge
Spreading the chocolate frosting onto the chocolate sponge
11. Finally, liberally sprinkle your cake with the topping of your choice. Don’t hold back: chocolate sprinkles, flakes, buttons, popping candy are all more than acceptable here.
Decorating the chocolate and red wine celebration cake with rainbow sprinkles 2
Decorating the chocolate and red wine celebration cake with rainbow sprinkles
The cake will keep in an airtight container for a couple of days, and longer in the fridge – after the first day the texture of the sponge became even fudgier. This recipe really is chocolate heaven.
Chocolate and red wine birthday cake with rainbow sprinkles 2

Sea salt and brandy truffles

Gift box of homemade sea salt and brandy truffles
Truffles and Christmas go together like Batman and Robin. Or peanut butter and jam. Or gin, tonic and sunshine. They’re the perfect treat to have around the house over the Christmas holidays, but they also make a lovely present for someone special, and they’re surprisingly straightforward to make (once you master the rolling!). Even better, they can be customised so that they are totally unique to you. I think the flavourings in these ones work particularly well with dark chocolate, with a hit of festive brandy and the odd burst of sea salt, but orange zest and Cointreau would be gorgeous, as would coconut-rum truffles rolled in desiccated coconut, or even sea salt and peanut butter truffles.
Ingredients for homemade sea salt and brandy truffles
Ingredients (makes about 20-25 truffles)
150g dark chocolate (at least 70% cocoa solids)
150ml double cream
25g butter
Pinch of sea salt flakes
Brandy
Cocoa powder

Method
1. Finely chop the dark chocolate into as small pieces as you can – you could also pop it in a food processor if you have one.
Chopped dark chocolate for sea salt and brandy truffles
Tip into a large bowl.
Chopped dark chocolate ready to add cream and butter
2. Heat the cream until it just begins to simmer. Remove from the heat and add the butter, stirring until it has melted.
Adding butter to the simmering double cream
3. Slowly pour the cream and butter over the chocolate, whisking continually until you have a smooth mixture.
Adding cream and butter to the chopped chocolate
Plain truffle mix
4. Add a generous pinch of sea salt, and enough brandy to taste. To be honest, my first batch didn’t quite have the hit of Christmas booze that I was hoping for (I had used 4 tsp of brandy) – the alcohol flavour was too subtle, so next time I’ll add at least 6 tsp. However, you can adjust this entirely to your own preference – taste after adding each tsp since you can always add more but you can’t take it back out!
Flavouring the truffle mix with sea salt and brandy
5. Chill in the fridge overnight until the mixture is solid. Sieve a few dessert spoons of coca powder onto a large plate (you do need to sieve it as cocoa powder tends to have a few lumps in it) and get another large plate ready for the truffles.
Preparing to shape the truffles
6. Now comes the hardest part, since the truffle mixture can seem really difficult to work with. The trick is to have your hands as cold as possible! Believe me, it’s a revelation. I was running my hands under cold water in between every one or two truffles and they rolled up so much easier. Use a teaspoon to break up the chocolate and then roll a small amount of mixture into a rough ball.
Shaping the sea salt and brandy truffles
7. Roll the truffles in cocoa powder (or icing sugar, or chocolate sprinkles, or desiccated coconut, or finely chopped pistachios…) and place on a clean plate. Chill in the fridge until ready to serve.
Shaped sea salt and brandy truffles
These can be stored in the fridge for a good 3-5 days (or even longer in the freezer), or box them up and proudly present them to their recipient. Serve in the afternoon for unexpected guests or after dinner with a strong coffee.
Homemade sea salt and brandy truffles served with coffee
I hope you all enjoy the next week of festive fun…only 6 sleeps til Christmas!

Chocolate mousse

Chocolate mousse served with redcurrants and creme fraiche
It feels like there’s always a long gap between my latest blog posts, since I’ve only been posting one recipe a week for a while now. Life has been busy, especially what with a certain political event happening in my country next Thursday (oh, and I guess there’s that PhD thing to be getting on with too). As much as a healthy dose of democracy is wonderful (and necessary) in life, at times what you really need is a respite from excessive politics. And what is the greatest antidote to politics? No, not alcohol: that is fuel of politics (or at least, “politics” around the dinner table with friends and family). Chocolate. Chocolate is the answer.

This chocolate mousse recipe could not be simpler if it tried – in fact, it comes from a children’s cookery book that we absolutely loved as kids. Posh it up with berries and cream if you want to serve for a fancy dessert, but really this can be whipped up in an instant (barring the chilling time in the fridge) if life is getting just a bit much and you need a large dose of comfort.
Ingredients for homemade dark chocolate mousse
Ingredients (serves 2)
60g good quality dark chocolate (about 70% cocoa solids)
2 eggs
Sea salt
Berries, or other fruit, to decorate
Crème fraiche for serving

Method
1. Break the chocolate into small chunks and place in a bain marie (a bowl placed over a pan of water, without the bowl actually touching the water) over a low heat. Heat slowly until the chocolate melts. Remove from the heat and set aside to allow the chocolate to cool.
Dark chocolate in a bain marie
Melted dark chocolate
2. Separate the eggs and beat the two yolks together well.
Seperating eggs for homemade chocolate mousse
3. Pour the yolks into the cooled melted chocolate and mix well to form a thick, glossy mixture.
Adding egg yolks to melted chocolate for chocolate mousse
Dark chocolate and egg yolk mixture for` chocolate mousse
4. Add a large pinch of salt to the egg whites and whisk until the whites are fluffy and make stiff peaks when you lift the whisk.
Egg whites whisked until stiff
5. Now the whisked whites need to be combined with the chocolate mixture – this is the trickiest step as you want to retain as much of the air that you just whisked into the whites as possible, so that the mousse has a lovely light texture. A good technique is to add about a third of the whites to the chocolate and stir fairly briskly to combine well and loosen the chocolate mixture. Now add another third of the whites, but this time fold gently with a large metal spoon until just combined – this should be a lot easier since the first batch of egg white went in. Finally fold in the remaining egg white, again folding gently.
Chocolate mousse to be spooned into dishes
6. Spoon the mixture into two small dishes or glasses and chill for at least a couple of hours before serving.
Dark chocolate mousse to be chilled
When you’re ready to serve, top the chocolate mousses with your chosen fruit and a small spoon of crème fraiche.
Chocolate mousse served with redcurrants and creme fraiche 1
Chocolate mousse served with redcurrants and creme fraiche
This is a rich pudding, with quite a bitter taste from the dark chocolate. You can use a lower coca content if you don’t like that bitter edge, but some gorgeously sweet berries will balance everything out otherwise. Comfort eat away!

Chocolate and Raspberry Loaf Cake

Raspberry and chocolate loaf cake
There are some food combinations that just undeniably work: tomato and basil, salmon and dill, goats cheese and figs, lamb and mint, and so it goes on. In my books, chocolate and fruit are one of these matches made in heaven. I’ve been seeing punnets of really plump, dark raspberries in the shops lately and find them utterly irresistible. After a fruitful (seewhatIdidthere) trip to the greengrocers on Sunday morning, I spent Sunday afternoon whipping up some treats for an afternoon tea catch-up with some of my very favourite ladies. Of course there had to be chocolate included in the spread somewhere, and so the chocolate-raspberry loaf was born.

If raspberries aren’t really to your taste (although we may have to have a little falling out if this is the case) or if you can’t get your paws on any, then this recipe would definitely be easy to adapt. Try candied orange peel folded through the sponge mix and orange zest in the icing. Or dried cherries and a splash of Kirsch. Or freeze-dried strawberries in the sponge and strawberry puree whisked through the icing. If the idea of fruit anywhere near your chocolate is an insult, then just leave the offending ingredients out for an unadulterated chocolate hit. A table spoon or two of cocoa powder in the icing might be more up your street. Whatever you decide, the underlying recipe is ridiculously easy – we’re using the “all-in-one” method where all the ingredients are whisked together in one go. No creaming, no risk of egg-curdling, no sifting. Convinced? Ready, set, let’s go!
Ingredients for chocolate and raspberry loaf cake
Ingredients
140g butter, softened
180g plain flour
20g cocoa powder
3 tsp baking powder
200g caster sugar
3 large eggs
6 tbsp milk
3 tbsp freeze-dried raspberries

125g butter, softened
250g icing sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tbsp milk
100g fresh raspberries

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 160C fan/180C/gas Mark 4. Butter a loaf tin and line with baking parchment. Leaving some excess paper hanging over the long sides makes it easier to lift the cake out after baking.
Lining a loaf tin with baking parchment
2. Place the butter, flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, caster sugar, eggs and milk in a large bowl. Using a hand whisk or wooden spoon mix the ingredients together for a few minutes until they are fully combined and the mixture has a light, aerated texture.
The all-in-one method for making a raspberry chocolate loaf
Chocolate loaf cake mix
3. Gently fold the freeze-dried raspberries through the cake batter. Try not to over-mix as you will lose some of the air that you whisked in at the previous step.
Folding in the freeze-dried raspberries to the chocolate cake mix
Chocolate and raspberry loaf cake mix
4. Spoon the mixture into the loaf tin and smooth flat with the back of a spoon.
Filling the loaf tin with chocolate and raspberry cake mix
5. Bake for 50 minutes, or until the cake is dark brown and a knife or cake tester comes out the centre of the cake clean. Lift out of the loaf tin and place on a wire rack to cool.
Cooling the chocolate and raspberry loaf cake on a wire rack
6. Whisk the softened butter together with the icing sugar for 5 minutes. A good tip here is to cover the bowl with a large tea towel to stop every surface in your kitchen becoming dusted in powdered sugar.
Ingredients for raspberry buttercream icing
7. Add the vanilla extract and milk, and continue whisking for a few more minutes. Finally add the fresh raspberries and whisk until evenly combined.
Adding vanilla to the buttercream icing
Adding fresh raspberries to the butter cream icing
Raspberry buttercream icing
Raspberry buttercream icing
8. Ice the top of the cooled loaf with a generous layer of raspberry icing.
Iced raspberry and chocolate loaf cake
This cake is super light and fluffy in texture, and the icing is a perfect mix of butter-icing sweetness and sharp raspberry flavour. It is at its peak eaten on the day of baking, but will keep well for another couple of days in an airtight container. Serve with tea or a large glass of ice-cold milk. Lovely.

Chocolate and Peanut Cookies

Dark chocolate and salted peanut cookies with coffee
We’re not big biscuit eaters in this household. However, that’s not to mean that we won’t say “Yes please” when the right one comes along. It was a lazy Saturday and I had a few hours alone in the flat before we were off out for a game of pitch and putt and then back for a movie night with friends (The Wolf of Wall Street – so brilliant, I highly recommend it). Cookies seemed like the ideal film-watching snack, something sweet and satisfying to graze on with a glass of wine in hand.

Every recipe that I have made from the The Londoner’s blog has turned out beautifully, from meatballs to jerk chicken to banana and Nutella muffins. Her recipes are usually simple and straightforward, but with consistently tasty results. In the back of my mind I remembered seeing a chocolate and peanut cookie recipe, so to my laptop and google it was. I only made a few small tweaks to the original cookie dough recipe: I used dark chocolate and salted peanuts since these were what I had in the cupboards, and added peanut butter for an extra peanut hit. I also slightly reduced the amount of vanilla extract as it seemed like a lot for the amount of dough, and, at £5 a small bottle, vanilla extract is a luxury in my kitchen!
Ingredients for dark chocolate and salted peanut cookies
Ingredients (makes 24 large cookies)
170g butter
200g light brown muscavado sugar
100g caster sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 egg, plus 1 egg yolk
250g plain flour
½ tsp bicarbonate of soda
½ tsp salt
2 tbsp peanut butter
80g dark chocolate – I used half dark chocolate chips and half dark chocolate broken into chunks
100g salted peanuts

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 160C fan/180C/Gas Mark 4.
2. Melt the butter over a low heat and mix with the two sugars.
Melted butter for chocolate and peanut cookies
Melted butter and sugar for dark chocolate and salted peanut cookies
3. Lightly beat the egg and egg yolk with the vanilla and add to the sugar mixture.
Egg, plus one yolk, and vanilla extract for chocolate and peanut cookies
Beaten eggs and vanilla extract for chocolate and peanut cookies
Eggs, butter and sugar mixed together for chocolate and peanut cookies
4. Weigh out the dry ingredients (flour, bicarbonate of soda and salt) and sift. Or, if you’re too lazy to sift (read: I’m too lazy to sift) give the flour a light whisk: hey presto, lump-free aerated flour! Add the wet ingredients and the peanut butter and mix well.
Mixing the wet and dry ingredients for chocolate and peanut cookie dough
Mixing the wet and dry ingredients with peanut butter for chocolate and peanut cookies
Dark chocolate and peanut cookie dough
5. Add the chocolate and peanuts and mix thoroughly so the ingredients are evenly distributed.
Adding salted peanuts and dark chocolate chunks to the cookie dough
Dark chocolate and salted peanut cookie dough
6. Line a couple of baking trays with greaseproof paper. Wet your hands as this will make it easier to roll the cookie dough without getting it stuck to your hands. Roll the cookies into balls, roughly the size of a golf ball or a little larger, and place on the baking trays. Remember that the cookies will spread quite a lot as they cook so generously space them apart – this meant I had to do mine in two batches, so place the dough in the fridge while you wait for the first batch to cook if you need to do the same.
Rolling out the dark chocolate and salted peanut cookies
7. Use a fork to gently press the cookies down. Note: if you don’t do this last step then the cookies will take a little longer to cook, so be aware of this.
Dark chocolate and salted peanut cookies ready to be baked
8. Bake for 12 minutes and remove onto a wire rack to cool. The cookies will seem incredibly soft when first out the oven but will firm up slightly as they cool, so don’t worry.
Dark chococlate and salted peanut cookies out the oven
These cookies were deeeelicious. The texture is crisp on the edges, but satisfyingly chewy in the middle just as a good cookie should be. The dark chocolate chunks melt slightly and stay gooey after cooling, while the peanuts add a lovely saltiness to the cookies. Salty and sweet is just the best combination right?
Dark chococlate and salted peanut cookies
Dark chocolate and salted peanut cookies 3
I think it’s safe to say that the cookies were a hit: David took a doggy bag of cookies away with him after movie night, Ross has been taking them to work every day since I baked them and I took a couple for some kids I look after: one inhaled the whole cookie in about 30 seconds and the other savoured every mouthful (ate half before swimming, wrapped the rest up, ate half of the half after swimming, wrapped the rest up, ate the final quarter when we got home – unbelievable restraint for a 6 year old, how do I achieve that?!). Both declared “These cookies are even better than the ones from the Commie Pool Café”. If that’s not high praise indeed I don’t know what is.